The effects of chemotherapeutic agents on the regulation of thrombin on cell surfaces Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • Thromboembolic disorders are common in cancer patients. Two major contributing factors are central venous catheters for drug delivery and the use of l-aparaginase, which decreases the plasma antithrombin level, but the causes of the hypercoagulable state in these patients are not fully understood. In this study, the T24/83 cell line was used as a model to investigate the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on cell surface thrombin regulation. Plasma thrombin generation and prothrombin consumption was increased in most of the treated cells, particularly vincristine- and adriamycin-treated cells (P < 0.05), compared with controls. However, no free thrombin generation or prothrombin consumption was observed in factor VII (FVII)-depleted plasma. No significant differences in the levels of thrombin-alpha2-macroglobulin (IIa-alpha2M) and thrombin-anti-thrombin (TAT) were observed between controls and any of the treatments, except for vincristine- and adriamycin-treated cells, which showed a significant difference in TAT production (P < 0.05). Also, there was an upregulation in tissue factor (TF) mRNA expression in etoposide-, methotrexate- and vincristine-treated monolayers compared with controls, as well as an upregulation in TF protein production in vincristine-treated cells. The data suggests that thrombin generation occurs via the extrinsic (TF-dependent) coagulation pathway on cell surfaces and that some chemotherapeutic agents are able to upregulate TF mRNA and protein expression in T24/83 cells.

publication date

  • January 2003