Criteria for social media-based scholarship in health professions education Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Social media are increasingly used in health professions education. How can innovations and research that incorporate social media applications be adjudicated as scholarship? OBJECTIVE: To define the criteria for social media-based scholarship in health professions education. METHOD: In 2014 the International Conference on Residency Education hosted a consensus conference of health professions educators with expertise in social media. An expert working group drafted consensus statements based on a literature review. Draft consensus statements were posted on an open interactive online platform 2 weeks prior to the conference. In-person and virtual (via Twitter) participants modified, added or deleted draft consensus statements in an iterative fashion during a facilitated 2 h session. Final consensus statements were unanimously endorsed. RESULTS: A review of the literature demonstrated no existing criteria for social media-based scholarship. The consensus of 52 health professions educators from 20 organisations in four countries defined four key features of social media-based scholarship. It must (1) be original; (2) advance the field of health professions education by building on theory, research or best practice; (3) be archived and disseminated; and (4) provide the health professions education community with the ability to comment on and provide feedback in a transparent fashion that informs wider discussion. CONCLUSIONS: Not all social media activities meet the standard of education scholarship. This paper clarifies the criteria, championing social media-based scholarship as a legitimate academic activity in health professions education.

authors

  • Sherbino, Jonathan
  • Arora, Vineet M
  • Van Melle, Elaine
  • Rogers, Robert
  • Frank, Jason R
  • Holmboe, Eric S

publication date

  • October 2015