Adenoviral gene transfer of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 in rat lung. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Replication-defective adenoviral vectors are capable of localized transfer and expression of incorporated gene product in lung tissue. We have constructed an adenoviral vector that expresses rat macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, a C-X-C chemokine specifically chemotactic for neutrophils, Supernatants from 293 cells, infected with the adenoviral MIP-2 (ADMIP-2) construct, showed potent chemotactic activity and the ability of the ADMIP-2 vector to transcribe and make functional protein was confirmed. In vivo analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from rats after intratracheal instillation of ADMIP-2 (10(9) plaque-forming units) showed a 10-fold increase in the absolute number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as opposed to rats treated with an equal titer of an E1-disabled control virus expressing firefly luciferase (ADCA-18). Neutrophils constituted 65% of total BAL cells with alveolar macrophages being the other major cell type recovered. Rat MIP-2 protein was increased (nanograms per milliliter) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid over a period of 7 days in ADMIP-2-treated animals. MIP-2 mRNA was demonstrated by Northern blot analysis in lung tissue, and histological analysis confirmed the presence of massive localized tissue neutrophilia. Evidence of chronic tissue injury and repair (ie, fibrosis) was not detected up to 2 weeks after the neutrophil infiltrate had resolved, subsequent to decreased chemokine presence. Adenoviral gene transfer proved an effective tool for the assessment of lung tissue expression of this chemokine in vivo and is useful in developing rodent models of tissue neutrophilia.

publication date

  • October 1996