Movement-induced gain modulation of somatosensory potentials and soleus H-reflexes evoked from the leg I. Kinaesthetic task demands Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Movement-related gating of cerebral somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) occurs during active and passive movements of both the upper and the lower limbs. The general hypothesis was tested that the brain participates in setting the gain of the ascending path from somatosensory receptors of the human leg to the somatosensory cortex. In experiment 1, SEPs from Cz' and soleus H-reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve in the popliteal fossa during passive movement about the right ankle. Early SEPs and H-reflexes sampled during simple passive movement were significantly attenuated when compared with stationary controls (P<0.05). The additional requirement of tracking the passive ankle movement with the other foot led to a significant relative facilitation of mean SEP, but not H-reflex amplitude, compared with means from passive movement alone (P<0.05). In experiment 2, SEPs were evoked in the active (tracking) leg during a forewarned reaction-time task. Subjects were required to move in a preferred direction or to track the passive movement of their right foot with their left. Significant attenuation of early SEP components occurred 100 ms prior to EMG onset (P<0.05), with no apparent effect due to tracking. In the 3rd experiment, SEPs and H-reflexes were evoked in the passively moved leg (the target for active movement of the left leg) during the same forewarned reaction-time task. During the warning period, SEPs were significantly attenuated compared with stationary controls for non-tracking movements, but not for movements involving tracking (P<0.05). It is concluded that centrifugal factors are important in modulating SEP gain required by the kinaesthetic demands of the task.

publication date

  • June 16, 1997