Use of Machine Learning for Predicting Escitalopram Treatment Outcome From Electroencephalography Recordings in Adult Patients With Depression Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Importance: Social and economic costs of depression are exacerbated by prolonged periods spent identifying treatments that would be effective for a particular patient. Thus, a tool that reliably predicts an individual patient's response to treatment could significantly reduce the burden of depression. Objective: To estimate how accurately an outcome of escitalopram treatment can be predicted from electroencephalographic (EEG) data on patients with depression. Design, Setting, and Participants: This prognostic study used a support vector machine classifier to predict treatment outcome using data from the first Canadian Biomarker Integration Network in Depression (CAN-BIND-1) study. The CAN-BIND-1 study comprised 180 patients (aged 18-60 years) diagnosed with major depressive disorder who had completed 8 weeks of treatment. Of this group, 122 patients had EEG data recorded before the treatment; 115 also had EEG data recorded after the first 2 weeks of treatment. Interventions: All participants completed 8 weeks of open-label escitalopram (10-20 mg) treatment. Main Outcomes and Measures: The ability of EEG data to predict treatment outcome, measured as accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity of the classifier at baseline and after the first 2 weeks of treatment. The treatment outcome was defined in terms of change in symptom severity, measured by the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, before and after 8 weeks of treatment. A patient was designated as a responder if the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale score decreased by at least 50% during the 8 weeks and as a nonresponder if the score decrease was less than 50%. Results: Of the 122 participants who completed a baseline EEG recording (mean [SD] age, 36.3 [12.7] years; 76 [62.3%] female), the classifier was able to identify responders with an estimated accuracy of 79.2% (sensitivity, 67.3%; specificity, 91.0%) when using only the baseline EEG data. For a subset of 115 participants who had additional EEG data recorded after the first 2 weeks of treatment, use of these data increased the accuracy to 82.4% (sensitivity, 79.2%; specificity, 85.5%). Conclusions and Relevance: These findings demonstrate the potential utility of EEG as a treatment planning tool for escitalopram therapy. Further development of the classification tools presented in this study holds the promise of expediting the search for optimal treatment for each patient.

authors

  • Zhdanov, Andrey
  • Atluri, Sravya
  • Wong, Willy
  • Vaghei, Yasaman
  • Daskalakis, Zafiris J
  • Blumberger, Daniel M
  • Frey, Benicio
  • Giacobbe, Peter
  • Lam, Raymond W
  • Milev, Roumen
  • Mueller, Daniel J
  • Turecki, Gustavo
  • Parikh, Sagar V
  • Rotzinger, Susan
  • Soares, Claudio N
  • Brenner, Colleen A
  • Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel
  • McAndrews, Mary Pat
  • Kleffner, Killian
  • Alonso-Prieto, Esther
  • Arnott, Stephen R
  • Foster, Jane
  • Strother, Stephen C
  • Uher, Rudolf
  • Kennedy, Sidney H
  • Farzan, Faranak

publication date

  • January 3, 2020