A scoping review of the literature on the current mental health status of physicians and physicians-in-training in North America Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: This scoping review summarizes the existing literature regarding the mental health of physicians and physicians-in-training and explores what types of mental health concerns are discussed in the literature, what is their prevalence among physicians, what are the causes of mental health concerns in physicians, what effects mental health concerns have on physicians and their patients, what interventions can be used to address them, and what are the barriers to seeking and providing care for physicians. This review aims to improve the understanding of physicians' mental health, identify gaps in research, and propose evidence-based solutions. METHODS: A scoping review of the literature was conducted using Arksey and O'Malley's framework, which examined peer-reviewed articles published in English during 2008-2018 with a focus on North America. Data were summarized quantitatively and thematically. RESULTS: A total of 91 articles meeting eligibility criteria were reviewed. Most of the literature was specific to burnout (n = 69), followed by depression and suicidal ideation (n = 28), psychological harm and distress (n = 9), wellbeing and wellness (n = 8), and general mental health (n = 3). The literature had a strong focus on interventions, but had less to say about barriers for seeking help and the effects of mental health concerns among physicians on patient care. CONCLUSIONS: More research is needed to examine a broader variety of mental health concerns in physicians and to explore barriers to seeking care. The implication of poor physician mental health on patients should also be examined more closely. Finally, the reviewed literature lacks intersectional and longitudinal studies, as well as evaluations of interventions offered to improve mental wellbeing of physicians.

publication date

  • December 2019