The effect of clinical teaching on patient satisfaction in rural and community settings. Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • INTRODUCTION: Few studies have examined the effect of clinical teaching on patient satisfaction in rural and community-based settings. We sought to examine whether patient satisfaction differed when patients were seen by a physician alone or by a physician and medical student in these settings. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in rural and community-based settings in southern Ontario (3 obstetrician-gynecologist offices and 4 family medicine clinics). Patients seen by a physician with or without a medical student present completed satisfaction and attitudes questionnaires about their experience. RESULTS: Patient satisfaction was high across both groups and did not differ when segregated by patient age, sex or employment status. Satisfaction scores were similar for patients seen by a physician with or without a student present. Satisfaction scores did not differ based on practice location. Patients' reasons for agreeing to be seen by a medical student included helping to teach students about medical concerns and helping to train future doctors. CONCLUSION: Patients in rural and community-based outpatient settings were satisfied with their care when a medical student was involved.

publication date

  • 2014