Effects of dietary fatty acid composition on the regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Dietary fatty acid composition, particularly polyunsaturated fatty acids, can affect both genetic and non-genetic regulatory mechanisms of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I, the main regulatory enzyme of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We aimed to determine how these regulatory mechanisms were affected by changes in the fatty acid composition of the diet in fish. Specifically, we fed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) either a high polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) diet, a high saturated fatty acid (SFA) diet or a mixed fatty acid control (CTL) diet for 8 weeks to determine if modifications of the dietary fatty acids would affect 1) the genetic expression of CPT I and its transcription factor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR), 2) the mitochondrial membrane composition and if these modifications would affect CPT I sensitivity to malonyl-CoA, and 3) levels of malonyl-CoA in the tissues. We found that fish fed the high PUFA diet significantly increased CPT I mRNA expression in red muscle, liver and adipose tissue, while PPAR alpha and beta expressions were variable across tissues. Few significant changes were observed in the mitochondrial membrane composition with the exception of DHA in the red muscle. There were no significant differences in CPT I sensitivity to malonyl-CoA or the malonyl-CoA content of the tissues with either experimental diet. Our present data suggest that changes in gene expression of CPT I and PPARs is the main regulatory mechanism controlling CPT I function in fish using our experimental diet.

publication date

  • January 2009