Effect of unilateral resistance training on arterial compliance in elderly men Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • An increase in age coincides with a decrease in arterial compliance, which is related to a higher risk for cardiovascular accidents. Evidence regarding the effects of resistance training on arterial compliance is conflicting. Currently, little information is available about the effect of resistance training on arterial compliance in elderly men. We assessed the impact of 10 weeks of unilateral arm and leg resistance training on carotid, brachial, and femoral arterial compliance in 12 healthy elderly men (mean age +/- SD, 71 +/- 7 y). Arterial compliance was evaluated before, after 4 weeks, and after 10 weeks of unilateral resistance training by simultaneously measuring arterial diameter and blood pressure in each artery. There were no significant differences in arterial compliance or stiffness index in any of the arteries examined after 10 weeks of training. However, after 10 weeks of resistance training, resting heart rate decreased from 76 +/- 4 beats/min to 61 +/- 3 beats/min (p < 0.05), plasma glucose decreased from 6.0 +/- 0.9 to 5.1 +/- 0.9 mmol/L (mean +/- SE) (p < 0.05), and carotid artery peak blood flow increased from 1831 mL/min to 2245 mL/min (p < 0.05). There were no significant changes in resting arterial blood pressure. Unilateral resistance training for 10 weeks does not alter peripheral and central arterial compliance elderly men.

publication date

  • August 2007