Surface temperature variations and their relationships with land cover in the Pearl River Delta Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The characteristics of land use/land cover (LULC) types may affect the thermal environment of urban zones. In this study, the urban zones of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) were examined to explore the spatiotemporal variations in land surface temperature (LST) from 2001 to 2017, as well as the relationships between LST and various influencing factors. Landscape pattern analysis was undertaken to explore the correlation between patch metrics and LST with resolutions from 100 m to 1 km. The results showed that (1) the high-temperature zones were mainly distributed on built-up land; the area of LST hot spots increased from 16% (2001) to 23% (2017). (2) The mean LST of each LULC type was calculated, indicating that the temperature of forestland was more than 5 °C lower than that of built-up land. (3) The landscape patterns of different land use types exhibited various effects on LST in terms of magnitude and importance. Considering the significance of the landscape indexes, it is necessary to avoid a large-scale layout of a single built-up land type when planning an urban environment. It is thus recommended that multiple contiguous forestlands be planned to mitigate urban heat island (UHI) effects. Furthermore, the landscape patterns and structure of different LULC types have various effects on LST and need to be explored in fine detail. This study helped reveal the impact of different LULC types on LST and provides urban planners in the PRD with optional schemes for mitigating the impacts of urbanization on the UHI.

publication date

  • October 2020