Platelet factor V New York: a defect in factor V distinct from that in factor V Quebec resulting in impaired prothrombinase generation. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Studies were performed on a patient with a longstanding bleeding disorder whose major defects were impaired platelet prothrombinase activity in the absence of added factor Va, and a platelet factor V value that was either decreased or at the lower limit of normal when assayed on multiple occasions. In contrast, plasma factor V values were consistently normal. Unlike Scott Syndrome, in which platelet prothrombinase activity is decreased in both the presence and absence of added factor V, her platelets appeared to utilize added factor Va normally in supporting the generation of prothrombinase activity. These findings suggest an intrinsic defect in platelet factor V as the basis of her platelet prothrombinase defect. This defect appears to be different than that described in the Quebec platelet disorder (factor V Quebec). Immunoblot analyses of washed platelet lysates demonstrated a pattern of variably sized factor V molecules that was entirely similar to that observed in normal platelets, and both the heavy and light chains of her factor V after thrombin cleavage were of the same size as that observed in normal platelets. In addition, her platelet multimerin was normal and immunoblot analysis excluded the type of generalized granular protein defect and pathological proteolysis that has been suggested to explain the factor V defect in the Quebec platelet disorder. The findings in this patient thus suggest a new type of platelet factor V defect as the basis for the impaired capacity of her activated platelets to support prothrombinase generation. The findings further support an important role for platelet factor V in hemostasis.

publication date

  • February 2001