Roberts syndrome fibroblasts showing cisplatin hypersensitivity have normal host cell reactivation of cisplatin-treated adenovirus and normal capacity of cisplatin-treated cells for adenovirus DNA synthesis Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Roberts syndrome (RS) is a rare, recessively inherited disorder characterized by growth retardation, limb reductions and craniofacial deformities. Cells from a subset of afflicted individuals, termed RS+, display unusual separation or puffing of the heterochromatic regions of their chromosomes and are hypersensitive to several DNA-damaging agents including mitomycin C (MMC) and cisplatin, both of which can induce interstrand crosslinks in DNA. For this reason, we have investigated the ability of RS+ fibroblasts to repair cisplatin-induced DNA lesions using adenoviris as a probe. Host cell reactivation of cisplatin-treated adenovirus (Ad) was significantly reduced in nucleotide excision repair (NER)-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells but was normal in the two RS+ fibroblast strains and the Fanconi's anemia (FA)fibroblast strain tested. The capacity of cisplatin-treated cells for Ad DNA synthesis was reduced in XP and FA cells compared to normal human cells, but was not reduced in RS+ cells. These results indicate that the hypersensitivity of RS+ cells to cisplatin is not due to a deficiency in NER nor due to a deficiency in the pathway which leads to cisplatin hypersensitivity in FA cells. It is possible that the abnormal heterochromatin organisation of RS+ cells selectively renders the heterochromatic regions of the genome more susceptible to mutagen damage and/or less available for repair.

publication date

  • September 1996