Boron levels in man: Preliminary evidence of genetic regulation and some implications for human biology Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Boron is a ubiquitous constituent of man's external environment. Levels of the element in human blood reflect both acute and chronic exposure, usually as dietary intake (food and drinking water). There is an absolute requirement for boron in vascular plants but evidence for biological essentiality in animals (including man) is limited. A high body burden of the element may be harmful, especially to young animals (including human neonates). Information on boron deficiency is scanty. It has been proposed that boron contributes to living systems by acting indirectly as a proton donor and that it exerts a particular influence on cell membrane structure and function. The present study examines the variation in blood levels within and between human sibships and provides some support for the possibility that boron metabolism is subject to genetic regulation.

publication date

  • March 1996