Atropine and Roscovitine Release from Model Silicone Hydrogels Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • PURPOSE: Drug delivery to the anterior eye has a low compliance and results in significant drug losses. In pediatric patients, eye diseases such as myopia and retinoblastoma can potentially be treated pharmacologically, but the risk associated with high drug concentrations coupled with the need for regular dosing limits their effectiveness. The current study examined the feasibility of atropine and roscovitine delivery from model silicone hydrogel materials which could potentially be used to treat myopia and retinoblastoma, respectively. METHODS: Model silicone hydrogel materials that comprised TRIS and DMA were prepared with the drug incorporated during synthesis. Various materials properties, with and without incorporated drug, were investigated including water uptake, water contact angle, and light transmission. Drug release was evaluated under sink conditions into phosphate buffered saline. RESULTS: The results demonstrate that up to 2 wt% of the drugs can be incorporated into model silicone hydrogel materials without adversely affecting critical materials properties such as water uptake, light transmission, and surface hydrophilicity. Equilibrium water content ranged from 15 to 32% and transmission exceeded 89% for materials with at least 70% DMA. Extended release exceeding 14 days was possible with both drugs, with the total amount of drug released from the materials ranging from 16% to over 76%. Although a burst effect was noted, this was thought to be due to surface-bound drug, and therefore storage in an appropriate packaging solution could be used to overcome this if desired. CONCLUSIONS: Silicone hydrogel materials have the potential to deliver drugs for over 2 weeks without compromising lens properties. This could potentially overcome the need for regular drop instillation and allow for the maintenance of drug concentration in the tear film over the period of wear. This represents a potential option for treating a host of ophthalmic disorders in children including myopia and retinoblastoma.

publication date

  • April 2016