Client-centred coaching in the paediatric health professions: a critical scoping review Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • PURPOSE: Coaching is mainstream in business and is expanding into paediatric health care. With the focus on evidence-informed health practice, it is imperative to identify the key active components of interventions. Coaching is by definition a complex intervention with numerous components. The purpose of this critical review is to determine how coaching is currently defined, its prevalence in paediatric health care services and the frequency of the active components of coaching and to consider the findings of research to date. METHOD: A critical review of the literature was conducted. Inclusion/exclusion criteria were based on the International Coach Federation, which stipulates that coaching is a collaborative process that involves client-centred goal setting, facilitation, self-discovery and capacity building. Seventeen studies were selected for thorough review. RESULTS: Throughout the literature, there was inconsistency in how coaching was defined. Studies included various components, but overall the literature lacked cohesion. CONCLUSION: To advance the field, a list of components that foster client engagement was developed along with a comprehensive definition of coaching involving affective, behavioural and cognitive components and a path of research necessary to evaluate this complex intervention. Implications for Rehabilitation A comprehensive approach to coaching involves consideration of multiple components. A coaching approach can enhance engagement in rehabilitation interventions. The operationalization of holistic ABC coaching that encapsulates the important components, which are affective, behavioural and cognitive in nature.

publication date

  • July 17, 2015