Use of tetracycline as an inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase activity secreted by human bone-metastasizing cancer cells. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Bone metastases are a common complication in prostate and breast cancer patients. It leads to extensive morbidity and eventually mortality. Matrix metalloproteinases are implicated in various steps of development of metastasis, through their ability to degrade the extracellular matrix. Increased matrix metalloproteinase activity of tumor cells has been associated with a higher metastatic potential. Inhibitors of metalloproteinases have been shown to effectively reduce or prevent the formation of metastases. The family of tetracyclines is able to inhibit matrix metalloproteinase activity through chelation of the zinc ion at the active site of the enzyme. Using tumor cell lines relevant to bone metastases, i.e. PC-3, MDA-MB-231, Hs696, B16/F1, we showed that tetracycline and derivatives of tetracycline, namely doxycycline and minocycline, also induced cytotoxicity. The effective concentrations are relatively high for plasma, but are clinically achievable in the bone, since tetracyclines are osteotropic. All four bone-metastasizing tumor cells produced and secreted various matrix metalloproteinases. Doxycycline was able to inhibit the activity of 72- and 92-kDa type IV collagenase secreted by bone-metastasizing cells by 79-87%. These characteristics could make tetracycline a unique candidate as a therapeutic agent to prevent bone metastases in cancer patients with a high likelihood for development of bone metastasis. Studies using animal models of experimental bone metastasis will be necessary to confirm this.

publication date

  • 1997

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