Allergen-induced Increases in Bone Marrow T Lymphocytes and Interleukin-5 Expression in Subjects with Asthma Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Inhaled allergen challenge of subjects with atopic asthmatic increases bone marrow eosinophil progenitor cells. Interleukin-5 (IL-5) specifically induces growth and maturation of eosinophils. This study examined the effect of allergen challenge on the number of bone marrow total and CD3+ cells expressing IL-5 protein and IL-5 mRNA in subjects with asthma who developed either allergen-induced isolated early responses, or early and late asthmatic responses (dual responders). At 24 hours after allergen challenge, dual responders had significantly greater blood and airway eosinophilia compared with early responders. There were significant increases in the percentage of bone marrow CD3+ cells (p < 0.005) in both groups. However, there were significant differences in the increases in bone marrow IL-5 mRNA+ (p < 0.005), CD3+ (p < 0.005), and IL-5 mRNA+ CD3+ (p < 0.005) cells between the dual and early responder groups. These results suggest that, in subjects with atopic asthma, inhaled allergen causes trafficking of T lymphocytes to the bone marrow, and that in subjects who develop late responses and greater blood and airway eosinophilia after inhalation of allergen, there is a significant increase in the ability of bone marrow cells, particularly T lymphocytes, to produce IL-5.

publication date

  • September 15, 2002

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