Peer interactions of normal and attention-deficit-disordered boys during free-play, cooperative task, and simulated classroom situations Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Groups of 30 ADD-H boys and 90 normal boys were divided into 30 mixed dyads composed of a normal and an ADD-H boy, and 30 normal dyads composed of 2 normal boys. Dyads were videotaped interacting in 15-minute free-play, 15-minute cooperative task, and 15-minute simulated classroom settings. Mixed dyads engaged in more controlling interaction than normal dyads in both free-play and simulated classroom settings. In the simulated classroom, mixed dyads completed fewer math problems and were less compliant with the commands of peers. ADD-H children spent less simulated classroom time on task and scored lower on drawing tasks than normal peers. Older dyads proved less controlling, more compliant with peer commands, more inclined to play and work independently, less active, and more likely to remain on task during the cooperative task and simulated classroom settings. Results suggest that the ADD-H child prompts a more controlling, less cooperative pattern of responses from normal peers.

publication date

  • June 1987