Analysis and Parametric Optimization of1H Off-Resonance Relaxation NMR Experiments Designed to Map Polypeptide Self-Recognition and Other Noncovalent Interactions Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The measurement of 1H off-resonance nonselective relaxation rates (R(theta,ns)) has been recently proposed as an effective method to probe peptide self-recognition, opening new perspectives in the understanding of the prefibrillization oligomerization processes in amylodogenesis. However, a full analysis and parametric optimization of the NMR experiments designed to measure R(theta,ns) relaxation rates is still missing. Here we analyze the dependence of the R(theta,ns) rates upon three critical parameters: the tilt angle of the effective field during the spin lock, the static magnetic field, and finally the repetition delay. Our analysis reveals that the tilt angle theta = 35.5 degrees not only minimizes spin-diffusion, but also avoids experimental artifacts such as J-transfer and poor adiabaticity. In addition, we found that when the dominant relaxation mechanism is caused by uncorrelated pairwise 1H dipole-1H dipole interactions the R(35.5 degrees,ns) rate is not significantly affected by static field variations, suggesting a wide applicability of the 1H off-resonance nonselective relaxation experiment. Finally, we show that the self-recognition maps based on the comparative analysis of the R(35.5 degrees,ns) rates can tolerate decreases in the interscan delays without significantly compromising the identification of critical self-association loci. These considerations not only provide a better understanding of the 1H off-resonance nonselective relaxation, but they also serve as guidelines for the optimal setup of this experiment.

publication date

  • October 2006