Increased gut serotonin production in response to bisphenol A structural analogs may contribute to their obesogenic effects Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Obesogens are synthetic, environmental chemicals that can disrupt endocrine control of metabolism and contribute to the risk of obesity and metabolic disease. Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most studied obesogens. There is considerable evidence that BPA exposure is associated with weight gain, increased adiposity, poor blood glucose control, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in animal models and human populations. Increased usage of structural analogs of BPA has occurred in response to legislation banning their use in some commercial products. However, BPA analogs may also cause some of the same metabolic impairments because of common mechanisms of action. One key effector that is altered by BPA and its analogs is serotonin, however, it is unknown if BPA-induced changes in peripheral serotonin pathways underlie metabolic perturbations seen with BPA exposure. Upon ingestion, BPA and its analogs act as endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract to influence serotonin production by the gut, where over 95% of serotonin is produced. The purpose of this review is to evaluate how BPA and its analogs alter gut serotonin regulation and then discuss how disruption of serotonergic networks influences host metabolism. We also provide evidence that BPA and its analogs enhance serotonin production in gut enterochromaffin cells. Taken together, we propose that BPA and many BPA analogs represent endocrine-disrupting chemicals that can influence host metabolism through the endogenous production of gut-derived factors, such as serotonin.

publication date

  • July 1, 2022