Chelating Silicone Dendrons: Trying to Impact Organisms by Disrupting Ions at Interfaces Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The viability of pathogens at interfaces can be disrupted by the presence of (cationic) charge and chelating groups. We report on the synthesis of silicone dendrimers and linear polymers based on a motif of hexadentate ligands with the ability to capture and deliver metal ions. Mono-, di- or trialkoxysilanes are converted in G1 to analogous vinylsilicones and then, iteratively using the Piers-Rubinsztajn reaction and hydrosilylation, each vinyl group is transformed into a trivinyl cluster at G2. The thiol-ene reaction with cysteamine or 3-mercaptopropionic acid and the trivinyl cluster leads to hexadentate ligands 3 × N–S or 3 × HOOC–S. The compounds were shown to effectively capture a variety of metals ions. Copper ion chelation was pursued in more detail, because of its toxicity. On average, metal ions form chelates with 2.4 of the three ligands in a cluster. Upon chelation, viscous oils are converted to (very) soft elastomers. Most of the ions could be stripped from the elastomers using aqueous EDTA solutions, demonstrating the ability of the silicones to both sequester and deliver ions. However, complete ion removal is not observed; at equilibrium, the silicones remain ionically crosslinked.

publication date

  • March 14, 2022