Healthcare professionals’ perceptions of P.I.E.C.E.S. education in supporting care delivery for older adults with responsive behaviours of dementia in acute care Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • INTRODUCTION: In acute care settings persons with dementia often use responsive behaviours such as yelling and hitting as a meaningful mode of communication. Staff dementia care education programs such as P.I.E.C.E.S. may help to address these gaps in care. P.I.E.C.E.S. is a holistic clinical assessment framework that focuses on Physical, Intellectual, and Emotional health, Capabilities of an individual, and the living Environment of a person and the Social being. AIMS: The aim of this interpretive descriptive study was to explore the perceptions of healthcare professionals of P.I.E.C.E.S. and recommendations to enhance its uptake. METHODS: A total of 15 healthcare professionals from acute medical settings in a hospital in Ontario participated in face-to-face, semi-structured interviews. Experiential thematic and secondary data analyses were performed. FINDINGS: P.I.E.C.E.S. had many positive perceived impacts such as promoting interdisciplinary collaboration. However, participants reported that it was challenging to sustain P.I.E.C.E.S. in practice which led to a tapering off of it approximately one year post-education. A barrier to applying P.I.E.C.E.S. was limited time. CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate the need for educational reinforcements and sustainability strategies for dementia care programs in acute care settings. Organizations should implement regular interdisciplinary meetings to provide opportunities for staff to apply P.I.E.C.E.S.

publication date

  • February 1, 2019