Hypoglycemia and Incident Cognitive Dysfunction: A Post Hoc Analysis From the ORIGIN Trial Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: Epidemiological studies have reported a relationship between severe hypoglycemia, cognitive dysfunction, and dementia in middle-aged and older people with type 2 diabetes. However, whether severe or nonsevere hypoglycemia precedes cognitive dysfunction is unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between hypoglycemia and incident cognitive dysfunction in a group of carefully followed patients using prospectively collected data in the Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention (ORIGIN) trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This prospective cohort analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial included individuals with dysglycemia who had additional cardiovascular risk factors and a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score ≥24 (N = 11,495). Severe and nonsevere hypoglycemic events were collected prospectively during a median follow-up time of 6.2 years. Incident cognitive dysfunction was defined as either reported dementia or an MMSE score of <24. The hazard of at least one episode of severe or nonsevere hypoglycemia for incident cognitive dysfunction (i.e., the dependent variable) from the time of randomization was estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model after adjusting for baseline cardiovascular disease, diabetes status, treatment allocation, and a propensity score for either form of hypoglycemia. RESULTS: This analysis did not demonstrate an association between severe hypoglycemia and incident cognitive impairment either before (hazard ratio [HR] 1.16; 95% CI 0.89, 1.52) or after (HR 1.00; 95% CI 0.76, 1.31) adjusting for the severe hypoglycemia propensities. Conversely, nonsevere hypoglycemia was inversely related to incident cognitive impairment both before (HR 0.59; 95% CI 0.52, 0.68) and after (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.51, 0.67) adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: Hypoglycemia did not increase the risk of incident cognitive dysfunction in 11,495 middle-aged individuals with dysglycemia.

publication date

  • January 2019