Divalent metals inhibit and lactose stimulates zinc transport across brush border membrane vesicles from piglets Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Interactions between metals of similar coordination chemistry are of relevance to infant nutrition due to the highly variable metal:metal ratios found in formulas. Using ratios similar to those found in infant formulas, our objectives were to determine the effects of metals and of lactose and other saccharides on Zn(+2) transport across intestinal brush border membranes. Brush border membrane vesicles prepared from intestines of 5 preweaned piglets were used to determine whether Ca(+2), Mg(+2), Fe(+2), Cu(+2), Cd(+2), or Mn(+2) would antagonize Zn(+2) uptake. (65)Zn(+2) uptake by brush border membrane vesicles was measured over 20 min with metal concentrations constant, and at 1 min with increasing metal concentrations. Zn(+2) bound to the external surface of vesicles was removed with ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid. Lactose induced Zn(+2) uptake to a greater extent than glucose polymer, whereas maltose, galactose, or galactose/glucose had no effect. Over 20 min, a 10:1 concentration of Fe(+2), Cd(+2), Cu(+2), and Mn(+2) lowered Zn(+2) uptake significantly (P < 0.05). Higher concentrations of divalent cation significantly lowered Zn(+2) (0.2 or 0.1 mM) uptake for all metals tested (P < 0.05), except for Mn(+2) (0.1 mM Zn(+2)). Inhibition constant determination quantified relative competitive potential with Mg(+2) < Ca(+2) < Mn(+2) < Fe(+2) < Zn(+2) < Cu(+2). Relative amounts of Ca(+2), Mg(+2), and Fe(+2) similar to those found in infant formulas reduced Zn(+2) uptake by at least 40%. Our data demonstrate that dietary minerals compete during brush border membrane transport, and may help explain antagonistic mineral interactions observed in vivo. Divalent metal concentrations and lactose content of milk affect zinc absorption in neonates and must be carefully considered in formula design.

publication date

  • February 2001