Extending the pre-processing holding time of whole blood beyond 48 h reduces coagulation FVIII activity and immunoglobulin G content of recovered plasma Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Plasma obtained via whole blood (WB) donation may be used either for transfusion or as recovered plasma (RP) for pooling and fractionation. In Canada, transfusable plasma must be processed within 24 h of phlebotomy, while the limit for RP processing is 72 h. We assessed the quality of RP produced by two WB processing methods and as a function of processing time. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: RP units produced via the buffy coat method (BCM, n = 26) or whole blood filtration (WBF, n = 52) were tested for: the activities of prothrombin, fibrinogen, von Willebrand Factor (VWF), FV, FVII, and FVIII; the prothrombin time (PT); and total protein and IgG concentration. WBF RP units were evenly divided between those processed <48 h of phlebotomy (shorter-processed) or 48-72 h after phlebotomy (longer-processed). RESULTS: WBF-RP did not differ significantly from BCM-RP in any tested parameter except for FV and FVIII, which exhibited mean reductions of 10.2% and 20%, respectively. Longer-processed WBF-RP did not differ significantly from shorter-processed WBF-RP in any tested parameter except for FVIII activity and IgG concentration, which exhibited mean reductions of 30.1% and 14.3%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Canadian RP is currently fractionated into IgG, albumin, fibrinogen, and FVII/VWF concentrates irrespective of its method or time of processing. Our results supported the current approach of fractionating both BCM- and WBF-derived RP, but suggest that greater yields of immunoglobulin and FVIII/VWF products could be obtained if the maximum processing time was reduced from 72 h to 48 h.

publication date

  • December 2018