Automated Pedestrian Safety Analysis at a Signalized Intersection in New York City: Automated Data Extraction for Safety Diagnosis and Behavioral Study Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Automated computer vision techniques were used to analyze 2 h of video data collected at a major signalized intersection in New York City. The main objectives of this study were to diagnose pedestrian safety issues and identify contributing factors at the intersection and to demonstrate the feasibility of the automatic extraction of pedestrian data required for pedestrian behavior analysis—mainly pedestrian speed and gait parameters. The safety study was conducted with traffic conflict techniques. The main factor that contributed to the high number of pedestrian and vehicle conflicts was found to be pedestrian violations, mainly temporal violations in which pedestrians crossed the street during the “Don't Walk” or flashing “Don't Walk” phase. During the 2 h analyzed, about one-third of pedestrians were noncompliant with the signal timing or crosswalk boundary (17.9% spatial violations and 15.3% temporal violations). Pedestrian speed, step frequency, and step length were automatically extracted for 333 pedestrians and were found to follow the normal distribution with 95% confidence (mean and standard deviation of 1.47 ± 0.27 m/s, 1.96 ± 0.17 Hz, and 0.75 ± 0.14 m, respectively). Gait analysis showed that the walking speed for single pedestrians was 9% higher than for those who walked in groups. Males tended to be slightly faster than females, with higher step length but lower step frequency. Violators tended to have higher walking speeds compared with non-violators, and the difference in speed was dependent on step length but not on step frequency.

publication date

  • January 2015