Correlates of former smoking in patients with cerebrovascular disease: a cross-sectional study Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To identify multilevel correlates of former smoking in patients with cerebrovascular disease. DESIGN: Secondary data analysis of the Canadian Community Health Survey. METHODS: We used data from the 2007-2008 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). Smoking status (former smoking vs smoker) was described by multilevel correlates of former smoking. A multilevel approach for variable selection for this study was used to understand how multiple levels in society can have an impact on former smoking. The study sample was selected from those respondents of the CCHS that reported they suffered from stroke symptoms. Logistic regression was used to predict former smoking in patients with cerebrovascular disease while controlling for multilevel confounders. Proportions were weighted to reflect the Canadian population. RESULTS: There were 172 355 respondents who reported to suffer from stroke. From this sample, 36.5% were smokers and 63.5% were former smokers. Age groups 55-69 and 70-80 and higher education (secondary education +) were positively related to former smoking. Household and vehicle smoking restrictions significantly predicted former smoking. Counselling advice from a physician and having access to a general practitioner were correlates of former smoking. Finally, the use of buproprion was positively related to former smoking. CONCLUSIONS: There are multilevel correlates of former smoking in smokers with reported stroke symptoms. These correlates include older age groups, higher education, household and vehicle smoking restrictions, pharmacotherapy use (bupropion), access to a general practitioner and counselling advice from a physician.

publication date

  • January 21, 2015