The impact of GI events on persistence and adherence to osteoporosis treatment: 3-, 6-, and 12-month findings in the MUSIC-OS study Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The goal of this multinational, prospective, observational study was to examine the relationship between gastrointestinal (GI) events and self-reported levels of medication adherence and persistence in postmenopausal women. A total of 73.9% of patients remained on their osteoporosis (OP) therapy at month 12, although the presence of a GI event at baseline, month 3, and month 6 significantly reduced month 12 persistence among new users. The odds of a month-12 ADEOS score ≥ 20 were significantly lower among patients who experienced a GI event between baseline and month 6. The occurrence of GI events was observed to be associated with a lower likelihood of patient adherence and persistence to OP medication. INTRODUCTION: This study examines the relationship between gastrointestinal (GI) events and self-reported adherence and persistence with initial osteoporosis (OP) therapy over the course of the first 12 months of treatment. METHODS: The Medication Use Patterns, Treatment Satisfaction, and Inadequate Control of Osteoporosis Study was a multinational, prospective, observational study examining the impact of GI events on OP management in postmenopausal women. Information regarding GI events was collected at the time of enrollment and at months 3, 6, and 12 of follow-up. Patients reported GI events and medication persistence and completed the 12-item Adherence Evaluation of Osteoporosis treatment (ADEOS) questionnaire. Multivariate logistic and general linear models examined the association between GI events at various time points and persistence and adherence at month 12. RESULTS: The study enrolled 2943 women; 22.8% were classified as new users of OP therapy and the remainder were considered experienced users. Across all patients, 68.1% reported GI events at baseline; by month 12, over 80% of subjects who completed follow-up reported at least one GI problem. The majority of patients (86.7%) were treated only with bisphosphonates at baseline. At month 12, 73.9% of patients remained on therapy; logistic regression revealed that those with GI problems by month 6 were significantly less likely to persist with treatment, after adjusting for other factors. The odds of a month 12 ADEOS score ≥ 20 (considered predictive of adherence) were significantly lower among patients who experienced a GI event between baseline and month 6. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of GI events was associated with a lower likelihood of patient adherence to and persistence with OP medication.

authors

  • Modi, A
  • Sen, S
  • Adachi, Jonathan Derrick
  • Adami, S
  • Cortet, B
  • Cooper, AL
  • Geusens, P
  • Mellström, D
  • Weaver, JP
  • van den Bergh, JP
  • Keown, P
  • Sajjan, S

publication date

  • February 2018