Physicochemical properties and in vitro digestibility of flour and starch from pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Flours and isolated starches from three different cultivars (1544-8, 1658-11 and 1760-8) of pea grown under identical environmental conditions were evaluated for their physicochemical properties and in vitro digestibility. The protein content, total starch content and apparent amylose content of pea flour ranged from 24.4 to 26.3%, 48.8 to 50.2%, and 13.9 to 16.7%, respectively. In pea starches, the 1760-8 showed higher apparent amylose content and total starch content than the other cultivars. Pea starch granules were irregularly shaped, ranging from oval to round with a smooth surface. All pea starches showed C-type X-ray diffraction pattern with relative crystallinity ranging between 23.7 and 24.7%. Pea starch had only a single endothermic transition (12.1-14.2 J/g) in the DSC thermogram, whereas pea flour showed two separate endothermic transitions corresponding to starch gelatinization (4.54-4.71 J/g) and disruption of the amylose-lipid complex (0.36-0.78 J/g). In pea cultivars, the 1760-8 had significantly higher setback and final viscosity than the other cultivars in both pea flour (672 and 1170cP, respectively) and isolated starch (2901 and 4811cP). The average branch chain length of pea starches ranged from 20.1 to 20.3. The 1760-8 displayed a larger proportion of short branch chains, DP (degree of polymerization) 6-12 (21.1%), and a smaller proportion of long branch chains, DP≥37 (8.4%). The RDS, SDS and RS contents of pea flour ranged from 23.7 to 24.1%, 11.3 to 12.8%, and 13.2 to 14.8%, respectively. In pea starches, the 1760-8 showed a lower RDS content but higher SDS and RS contents. The expected glycemic index (eGI), based on the hydrolysis index, ranged from 36.9 to 37.7 and 69.8 to 70.7 for pea flour and isolated pea starch, respectively.

publication date

  • January 2012