Predictors of Work-Related Repetitive Strain Injuries in a Population Cohort Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVES: We assessed predictors of work-related repetitive strain injuries using data from 4 waves of the Canadian National Population Health Survey. METHODS: Participants were 2806 working adults who completed an abbreviated version of the Job Content Questionnaire in 1994-1995 and did not experience repetitive strain injuries prior to 2000-2001. Potential previous wave predictors of work-related repetitive strain injuries were modeled via multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Female gender (odds ratio [OR] = 1.98; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.24, 3.18), some college or university education (OR=1.98; 95% CI=1.06, 3.70), job insecurity (OR=1.76; 95% CI=1.07, 2.91), high physical exertion levels (OR = 2.00; 95% CI = 1.29, 3.12), and high levels of psychological demands (OR = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.02, 2.52) were all positively associated with work-related repetitive strain injuries, whereas working less than 30 hours per week exhibited a negative association with such injuries (OR=0.2; 95% CI=0.1, 0.7). CONCLUSIONS: Modifiable job characteristics are important predictors of work-related repetitive strain injuries.

publication date

  • July 2005