Social and economic consequences of workplace injury: A population-based study of workers in British Columbia, Canada Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Existing research suggests that workplace injuries can have significant economic and social consequences for workers; but there are no quantitative studies on complete populations. METHODS: The British Columbia Linked Health Database (BCLHD) was used to examine 1994 injured workers who lost work time due to the injury (LT) and a group of injured individuals who did not lose time after their injuries (NLT). Three outcomes were explored: (1) residential change, (2) marital instability, and (3) social assistance use. Logistic regression adjusted for several individual and injury characteristics. RESULTS: LTs were more likely to move and collect income assistance benefits, and less likely to experience a relationship break-up than the NLTs. LTs off work for 12 or more weeks were more likely to receive income assistance than LTs off for less time. CONCLUSIONS: The increased risk suggests that the long-term economic consequences of disabling work injury may not be fully mitigated by workers compensation benefits.

publication date

  • September 2007