An Inhaled Corticosteroid, Budesonide, Reduces Baseline but Not Allergen-induced Increases in Bone Marrow Inflammatory Cell Progenitors in Asthmatic Subjects Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • We have previously shown that allergen inhalation by asthmatics is associated with increases in bone marrow eosinophil/basophil colony-forming cells (Eo/B-CFU), and increases in CD34(+) hemopoietic progenitors expressing the alpha-subunit of the IL-5 receptor (IL-5Ralpha). This study investigated the effect of inhaled corticosteroid on baseline numbers and allergen-induced increases in these parameters. Nine subjects with mild, stable asthma inhaled budesonide (400 microgram/d) for 8 d in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized crossover study. On Day 7, subjects inhaled allergen, with bone marrow sampling before and 24 h after challenge. Budesonide inhalation significantly attenuated the allergen-induced early and late asthmatic responses, degree of increase in sputum and blood eosinophils, as well as the baseline numbers of total bone marrow CD34(+) cells (p < 0.05), CD34(+)IL-3Ralpha+ cells (p < 0.01) and IL-5-responsive Eo/B-CFU (p < 0.05). Allergen inhalation significantly increased Eo/B-CFU grown in the presence of IL-3, GM-CSF, or IL-5 alone (p < 0.05) and in combination (p < 0.01), as well as the number of CD34(+)IL-5Ralpha+ cells (p < 0.01). However, these increases in Eo/B-CFU and CD34(+)IL-5Ralpha+ cells were not affected by budesonide treatment. These data demonstrate that short-term inhaled budesonide treatment has a systemic effect in inhibiting the turnover of a subpopulation of bone-marrow-derived progenitors, but that inhalation of allergen overcomes this inhibitory effect.

publication date

  • May 1999