Growth Hormone and Cortisol Responses, Tranquillizer Usage, and Their Association with Survival From Myocardial Infarction Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Sixty-six patients consecutively admitted to a Coronary Care Unit with a diagnosis of myocardial infarction were evaluated physically, psychologically, and neuroendocrinologically. Records were also kept of appetite and drug intake. Serum cortisol and growth hormone, physical, and mood variables were evaluated daily and the neuroendocrine measures were also taken serially at the time of removal from the cardiac monitor. At the end of the 2 years the patient's functional status was evaluated and the outcome correlated with the aforementioned indices. Three factors emerged as being significantly related to outcome. Survivors' appetites were significantly better than the appetities of nonsurvivors. Those who were alive at follow-up had taken significantly more minor tranquilizers than those who had died. Survivors had consistently lower levels of growth hormone than nonsurvivors and these differences were statistically significant for those samples taken at the time of removal from the monitor. The findings are incorporated in two new indices predictive of both survival and functional outcome.

publication date

  • October 1978