The surface effect of dentifrices Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The aim of this study was to evaluate clinically three commercially available dentifrices and to determine any surface effects on tooth or gingival surfaces. Sixty-four participants were included in this study and were allocated randomly to one of four treatment groups by an independent person to ensure the investigators were unaware of the brushing material used. All toothbrushes and dentifrices were distributed by this independent person. The treatment groups were: Group 1--brush with water; Group 2--brush with Colgate (Baking Soda and Peroxide); Group 3--brush with Macleans (Whitening); Group 4--brush with Colgate (Sensation Whitening). All participants were requested to brush both morning and evening in their customary fashion using only the designated toothpaste, or water, for four weeks. All participants were required to use the same toothbrush type. No other oral hygiene products such as mouth rinses or dental floss were used during the trial period. Prior to commencement of the brushing period, all participants received a full clinical examination recording the status of the soft and hard tissues including a gingival index (Löe and Silness) to record gingival condition. A polyvinyl siloxane impression was taken of the six anterior teeth and gingival tissues at the commencement of the trial. After four weeks, a second full clinical examination was made and further silicone impressions were taken of the anterior teeth. All impressions were cast in epoxy resin for investigation with light and electron microscopy. Participants were also asked to answer a questionnaire relating to the toothpaste used. The results of this study indicated that no significant clinical differences were recorded for any dentifrice or water and there was no significant difference in gingival index scores over the four week period. Patient responses to each dentifrice varied according to individual patient preferences and expectations and no consistent findings could be determined. Light and electron microscopy indicated that tooth and gingival surface changes that occurred over the four week period with any of the dentifrices were similar to, and not significantly different from, changes seen with the use of water alone. These results indicate that none of the dentifrices tested was harmful to teeth or soft tissues.

publication date

  • June 2000

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