Hypersulfated Low Molecular Weight Heparin with Reduced Affinity for Antithrombin Acts as an Anticoagulant by Inhibiting Intrinsic Tenase and Prothrombinase Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • In buffer systems, heparin and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) directly inhibit the intrinsic factor X-activating complex (intrinsic tenase) but have no effect on the prothrombin-activating complex (prothrombinase). Although chemical modification of LMWH, to lower its affinity for antithrombin (LA-LMWH) has no effect on its ability to inhibit intrinsic tenase, N-desulfation of LMWH reduces its activity 12-fold. To further explore the role of sulfation, hypersulfated LA-LMWH was synthesized (sLA-LMWH). sLA-LMWH is not only a 32-fold more potent inhibitor of intrinsic tenase than LA-LMWH; it also acquires prothrombinase inhibitory activity. A direct correlation between the extent of sulfation of LA-LMWH and its inhibitory activity against intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase is observed. In plasma-based assays of tenase and prothrombinase, sLA-LMWH produces similar prolongation of clotting times in plasma depleted of antithrombin and/or heparin cofactor II as it does in control plasma. In contrast, heparin has no effect in antithrombin-depleted plasma. When the effect of sLA-LMWH on various components of tenase and prothrombinase was examined, its inhibitory activity was found to be cofactor-dependent (factors Va and VIIIa) and phospholipid-independent. These studies reveal that sLA-LMWH acts as a potent antithrombin-independent inhibitor of coagulation by attenuating intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase.

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publication date

  • March 30, 2001

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