Changes in Antioxidant Defense Enzymes after d-amphetamine Exposure: Implications as an Animal Model of Mania Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress is associated with amphetamine-induced neurotoxicity, but little is known about the adaptations of antioxidant enzymes in the brain after amphetamine exposure. We studied the effects of acute and chronic amphetamine administration on superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity, in a rodent model of mania. Male Wistar rats received either a single IP injection of D-: amphetamine (1 mg/kg, 2 mg/kg, or 4 mg/kg) or vehicle (acute treatment). In the chronic treatment rats received a daily IP injection of either D-: amphetamine (1 mg/kg, 2 mg/kg, or 4 mg/kg) or vehicle for 7 days. Locomotor behavior was assessed using the open field test. SOD and CAT activities were measured in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. Acute and to a greater extent chronic amphetamine treatment increased locomotor behavior and affected SOD and CAT activities in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Our findings suggest that amphetamine exposure is associated with an imbalance between SOD and CAT activity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum.

authors

  • Frey, Benicio
  • Valvassori, Samira S
  • Réus, Gislaine Z
  • Martins, Márcio R
  • Petronilho, Fabrícia C
  • Bardini, Katrine
  • Dal-Pizzol, Felipe
  • Kapczinski, Flavio
  • Quevedo, João

publication date

  • May 2006