Increased oxidative stress and DNA damage in bipolar disorder: A twin-case report Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: There is an emerging body of data suggesting that oxidative stress may be associated with the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD). In the present study we investigated the oxidative stress profile in two monozygotic twins during a manic episode. METHODS: Two monozygotic twins diagnosed as currently manic by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV were studied. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were measured as parameters of oxidative stress. DNA damage was assessed using the single cell gel electrophoresis technique (Comet Assay). All biochemical measures were conducted at baseline and after a 6-week treatment. RESULTS: Bipolar twins had higher TBARS, SOD and DNA damage, and lower CAT than the healthy control. TBARS and SOD were normalized after mood stabilization, whereas CAT and DNA damage remained altered at week 6. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support that oxidative stress may play a role in the pathophysiology of BD and that pharmacological treatment may exert antioxidant effects. Studies with larger samples are warranted to further clarify this issue.

publication date

  • January 2007

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