Novel polymer-grafted starch microparticles for mucosal delivery of vaccines Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Recent studies have demonstrated that systemic and mucosal administration of soluble antigens in biodegradable microparticles can potentiate antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. However, current microparticle formulations are not adequate for all vaccine antigens, necessitating the further development of microparticle carrier systems. In this study, we developed a novel microparticle fabrication technique in which human serum albumin (HSA) was entrapped in starch microparticles grafted with 3-(triethoxysilyl)-propyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (TS-PDMS), a biocompatible silicone polymer. The immunogenicity of HSA was preserved during the microparticle fabrication process. Following intraperitoneal immunization of mice, TS-PDMS-grafted microparticles (MP) dramatically enhanced serum IgG responses compared with ungrafted MP and soluble HSA alone (P < 0.001). When delivered orally, both TS-PDMS-grafted and ungrafted microparticles elicited HSA-specific IgA responses in gut secretions, in contrast to orally administered soluble antigen. Indeed, TS-PDMS-grafted microparticles stimulated significantly stronger serum IgG (P < 0.005) and IgA (P < 0.001) responses compared with those elicited by ungrafted microparticles. These findings indicate that TS-PDMS-grafted starch microparticles have potential as systemic and mucosal vaccine delivery vehicles.

publication date

  • May 1996

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