Lifestyle, dietary, and medical history factors associated with pancreatic cancer risk in Ontario, Canada Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVES: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has one of the worst survival rates of all the cancers. Established risk factors for this malignancy are smoking, body mass index (BMI) and family history of pancreatic cancer. Findings are inconsistent regarding pancreatitis, diabetes, allergies, intake of fruit, vegetables, red meat, alcohol, caffeine, vitamin C, calcium, and folate supplements. Possible pancreatic cancer risk factors were evaluated within the population-based Ontario Pancreas Cancer Study. METHODS: Pathologically confirmed pancreatic cancer cases (n = 422) were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry between 2003 and 2007. Controls (n = 312) were recruited through random digit dialing. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires. Multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios. RESULTS: Smoking, BMI, family history of pancreatic cancer, and caffeine were significantly associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk, while fruit intake and allergies significantly decreased risk. No other significant associations were observed in the multivariate model. Effect modification by smoking status was suggested for caffeine, family history of pancreatic cancer, BMI, and fruit. CONCLUSIONS: This study further clarifies the association between several lifestyle, dietary and medical history factors, and pancreatic cancer risk, many of which are potentially modifiable. Possible effect modification by smoking status should be further explored in future etiologic studies.

publication date

  • August 2009