Patient preferences before and after total knee arthroplasty Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: Patients before total joint arthroplasty vary in the spectrum and importance of their concerns. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Knee Patient-Specific Index (KPSI) and to determine the type and importance of patients' concerns before and after knee arthroplasty. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A cohort of 119 patients scheduled for elective primary (or revision) total knee arthroplasty were interviewed at two tertiary care teaching hospitals. Patients also completed the Knee Society Scale (KSS), the Short Form 36, the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and the McMaster Toronto Arthritis Patient Preference Disability Questionnaire (MACTAR). RESULTS: Patients improved after total knee arthroplasty in all 42 symptoms and physical limitations, except crouching/kneeling and walking up and down stairs. Patients' summated concerns correlated with the WOMAC pain subscale (ranging from 0.72 to 0.79), WOMAC physical function subscale (ranging from 0.72 to 0.76), and KSS (ranging from 0.28 to 0.39). The summated responses changed after knee arthroplasty as demonstrated by the standardized response mean of 1.1. CONCLUSIONS: The KPSI captures individual patient unique preferences for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Patients improved in virtually all aspects of their symptoms and function after surgery, with the exception of crouching/kneeling and knee feeling hot.

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publication date

  • July 2010