Prediction of resource utilization and case cost for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage at a canadian community hospital Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH) is common, and thus imposes a substantial burden on health care resources. We describe resource utilization and cost for management of acute nonvariceal UGIH, and studied their variation among population subgroups. METHODS: Resource utilization and direct medical case costs were extracted for consecutive admissions for nonvariceal UGIH at a large community hospital in southern Ontario through chart review and adaptation of an administrative case cost database. Univariate and multiple regression models were then developed to identify independent demographic predictors of case cost and length of stay. RESULTS: Among 116 eligible admissions the average length of stay and case cost were 4.26 days and Can$2690, respectively (Can$1 = US$0.70). Both cost and length of stay demonstrated significant univariate relationships with age, comorbid illness, prior peptic ulcer disease (PUD), and prior UGIH. Age and prior PUD persisted as independent predictors in multiple regression models. An inverse transformation of total case cost allowed these variables to explain 26% of the total variance. CONCLUSIONS: Resource utilization for management of acute nonvariceal UGIH at a Canadian community hospital varies substantially among population subgroups, but correlates independently with age and prior ulcer history. Careful attention must be paid to practice environments and demographic profiles before economic models of strategies to prevent or treat UGIH are applied to specific subpopulations.

publication date

  • July 1999