Effect of Clinical Risk Stratification on Cost-Effectiveness of the Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Three randomized clinical trials showed that implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) reduce the risk of death in survivors of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, but the cost per year of life gained is high. A substudy of the Canadian Implantable Defibrillator Study (CIDS) showed that 3 clinical factors, age >/=70 years, left ventricular ejection fraction /=2 of 3 risk factors. Incremental cost-effectiveness of ICD therapy was computed as the ratio of the difference in mean cost to the difference in life expectancy between the 2 groups. Over 6.3 years, the mean cost per patient in the ICD group was Canadian (C) $87 715 versus $38 600 in the amiodarone group (C$1 approximately US$0.67). Life expectancy for the ICD group was 4.58 years versus 4.35 years for amiodarone, for an incremental cost-effectiveness of ICD therapy of C$213 543 per life-year gained. The cost per life-year gained in patients with >/=2 factors was C$65 195, compared with C$916 659 with <2 risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: The cost-effectiveness of ICD therapy varies by patient risk factor status. The use of ICD therapy in patients who have >/=2 risk factors of age >/=70 years, left ventricular ejection fraction

publication date

  • October 2, 2001