Relation between patterns of intrinsic network connectivity, cognitive functioning, and symptom presentation in trauma-exposed patients with major depressive disorder Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: The present study investigated resting fMRI connectivity within the default mode (DMN), salience (SN), and central executive (CEN) networks in relation to neurocognitive performance and symptom severity in trauma-exposed patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). METHOD: Group independent component analysis was conducted among patients with MDD (n = 21), examining DMN, SN, and CEN connectivity in relation to neurocognitive performance and symptom severity. Activation in these networks was also compared between the patient group and healthy controls (n = 20). RESULTS: Among the patient group, higher levels of performance on measures of verbal memory and executive functioning were related to increased connectivity within the DMN (i.e., inferior parietal lobe; precuneus). Greater depression severity was related to reduced connectivity between the SN and a node of the DMN (i.e., posterior cingulate cortex) and higher depersonalization symptoms were related to enhanced connectivity between the SN and a node of the DMN (i.e., middle temporal gyrus). Higher symptoms of depersonalization were also associated with reduced integration of the DMN with the medial frontal gyrus. Relative to controls, patients with MDD showed greater connectivity of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex within the DMN. CONCLUSION: Intrinsic connectivity network patterns are related to cognitive performance and symptom presentation among trauma-exposed patients with MDD.

publication date

  • May 2017