The Influence of Calcium lonophore and Activators of Protein Kinase C on Steroid Production by Preovulatory Ovarian Follicles of the Goldfish1 Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • Steroidogenesis in teleost fish, as in other vertebrate groups, is mediated by the activation of adenylate cyclase. For the present studies, calcium ionophore A23187 and either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (OAG) were used to investigate the possible roles that changes in intracellular calcium content and protein kinase C activation play in steroid production by goldfish preovulatory ovarian follicles incubated in vitro. While ineffective alone, PMA (1.6-400 nM) and OAG (25-100 micrograms/ml) exhibited classical synergism with A23187 (1.0-10 microM), leading to increased testosterone production. The magnitude of these responses was at least tenfold lower than that obtained with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), forskolin, or dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate. Testosterone production stimulated by hCG and forskolin was blocked by addition of PMA but not OAG. Unlike PMA, the inactive phorbol ester 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-dideconate did not influence basal or stimulated testosterone production. A23187 had a biphasic effect on stimulated testosterone production: a dosage of 0.25 or 1.0 microM potentiated the action of submaximally effective dosages of hCG or forskolin on testosterone production; a higher dosage of 4 microM inhibited stimulated testosterone production by up to 50%. In conclusion, these studies suggest that, in addition to the adenylate cyclase second messenger system, changes in intracellular calcium and activation of protein kinase C may modulate steroidogenesis in goldfish ovarian follicles.

publication date

  • December 1, 1989