Asymmetries in the discrete and pseudocontinuous regulation of visually guided reaching Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • An experiment was conducted to examine the contribution of the hemispheres to the organization of aiming movements. The spatial positions of targets were obtained by extrapolating from brief visual displays of geometric patterns. The patterns comprised linear, quadratic, cubic, and quartic mathematical functions and varied in spatial complexity. Vision of the hand was also manipulated. While the hands did not differ in spatial accuracy, movements made by the right hand were of shorter duration and had higher peak velocities. The stimulus pattern strongly influenced kinematics, in particular the number of discrete modifications of the movement trajectory. Vision of the hand resulted in superior accuracy, although subjects were unable to compare the relative positions of the limb and the target. Vision of the hand did not lead to an increase in discrete adjustments, suggesting that visual information was used in a continuous fashion. Movements into ipsilateral space differed from those into contralateral space with respect to a number of parameters.

publication date

  • March 1992