Between-trial inhibition and facilitation in goal-directed aiming: manual and spatial asymmetries Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Three experiments were conducted with right-handed participants to examine between-trial inhibition and facilitation effects in goal-directed aiming. Participants were required to execute rapid left-hand or right-hand aiming movements upon illumination of a target light in left or right space. Thus, from trial to trial, participants executed movements to either the same target location or a different target location with the either same hand or the other hand. Our reaction time results indicated that participants were particularly slow in initiating their movements when they were required to return to the same target location with the other hand. This was especially the case when the right hand was required to move to a target just occupied by the left hand. For both reaction time and movement time the right hand but not the left hand exhibited an advantage when it was required to perform the same movement two times in a row. Taken together these results suggest that inhibition of return, in a target-target paradigm, is more associated with the particular spatial location of the target than the organization of a specific movement to that location. Moreover, the between-trial facilitation observed for the right hand may reflect the ability of the left cerebral hemisphere to maintain an already parameterized motor program over a short intertrial interval.

publication date

  • January 2005

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