Visual regulation of manual aiming: A comparison of methods Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Visual regulation of upper limb movements occurs throughout the trajectory and is not confined to discrete control in the target area. Early control is based on the dynamic relationship between the limb, the target, and the environment. Despite robust outcome differences between protocols involving visual manipulations, it remains difficult to identify the kinematic events that characterize these differences. In this study, participants performed manual aiming movements with and without vision. We compared several traditional approaches to movement analysis with two new methods of quantifying online limb regulation. As expected, participants undershot the target and their movement endpoints were more variable when vision was not available. Although traditional measures such as reaction time, time after peak velocity, and the presence of discontinuities in acceleration were sensitive to the visual manipulation, measures quantifying the trial-to-trial spatial variability throughout the trajectory were the most effective in isolating the time course of online regulation.

publication date

  • November 2010