A226 CHILD AND PARENT PERCEPTIONS OF FAECAL MICROBIOTA TRANSPLANT (FMT): QUALITATIVE PERSPECTIVES FROM PARTICIPANTS IN A TRIAL OF FMT FOR PEDIATRIC ULCERATIVE COLITIS Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Abstract Background Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) is being increasingly studied across a range of therapeutic indications, including ulcerative colitis (UC). Pediatric patients may have unique responses to microbiome-based therapeutics, given their younger age, fewer comorbidities, and greater susceptibility to medication-related side effects. Aims We recently conducted the first pilot RCT of FMT in Canada for the treatment of pediatric ulcerative colitis (PediFETCh Trial) and conducted qualitative interviews post-study of participants and their parents. This study aims to describe the experience and perceptions of children who received FMT, and their parents. Methods Patients enrolled in the PediFETCh Trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02487238) and their parents were invited to participate in face-to-face, semi-structured interviews. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using open coding (NVivo 12 Pro). Results 8 patients and 8 parents were interviewed. Our data has been summarized into 4 domains and 11 composite themes (Table 1). Most patients and parents saw FMT as a natural treatment. Pre-treatment, patients were concerned with receiving “someone else’s poo” and physical discomfort, while parents were concerned with transmission of enteric infections or psychiatric diseases. Both felt their decision to pursue FMT was influenced by frustration with previous lack of response to medications and a fear of medication side effects. Post-treatment, most patients and families expressed no concerns over potential future side effects as a result of the FMT, and all patients reported feeling “completely normal”. Patients were split between preferring FMT or medication, with convenience of medication being an important factor, while others favored FMT for its perceived naturality and symptomatic improvements. For most families, natural therapies and diet played an important role in influencing their decision to pursue FMT; however, several parents reported that alternative healthcare practitioners did not support their desire to pursue FMT. Conclusions The study offers valuable insights into pediatric patients’ and parents’ experiences receiving FMT across several themes. Our results suggest a high rate of acceptance and interest in FMT research by pediatric patients and their parents. These findings suggest strategies to improve future delivery of FMT in clinical trials, and should support inclusion of children in FMT-based studies.Table 1: Domain and thematic breakdown. Funding Agencies Hamilton Health Sciences New Investigator Fund (2015, Spring); Innovation Fund of the Alternative Funding Plan for the Academic Health Sciences Centres of Ontario (HAH-17-002)

publication date

  • February 2020