The Longitudinal Youth in Transition Study (LYiTS) Cohort Profile: Exploration by Hospital- Versus Community-Based Mental Health Services Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • Objectives Youth face numerous challenges in receiving coordinated and continuous mental health services, particularly as they reach the age of transition from child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) to adult mental health services (AMHS). The Longitudinal Youth in Transition Study (LYiTS) follows youth prospectively as they cross this transition boundary to better understand their transition pathways and resulting symptoms and health service use outcomes. The current paper presents the baseline profile description for the LYiTS cohort and additionally examines differences in symptoms and functioning and health service utilization between youth receiving services at hospital- versus community-based CAMHS. Methods A cross-sectional design was used. A sample of 237 16–18-year-old youth recruited from outpatient CAMHS at two hospitals and two community sites completed self-report measures at their first of four annual assessments. A latent profile analysis was conducted to identify symptomology profiles, and youth were compared on symptoms and health service use between hospital- and community-based sites. Results Four distinct symptomology profiles were identified (subclinical, moderate internalizing, moderate externalizing, and high symptomology). Symptom profiles and functioning levels reported by youth were no different across both types of organization, although there were differences detected in health service utilization, such as type of provider seen and use of medications. Conclusions These findings suggest that there is little difference in symptomology between youth accessing hospital versus community-based CAMHS. With growing interest in understanding the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different models of mental health care, these findings provide a new understanding of the clinical and service use profiles of transition-aged youth that will be explored further as this cohort is followed across the CAMHS to AMHS transition boundary.

authors

  • Cleverley, Kristin
  • Davies, Julia
  • Brennenstuhl, Sarah
  • Bennett, Kathryn Jane
  • Cheung, Amy
  • Henderson, Joanna
  • Korczak, Daphne J
  • Kurdyak, Paul
  • Levinson, Andrea
  • Pignatiello, Antonio
  • Stevens, Katye
  • Voineskos, Aristotle N
  • Szatmari, Peter

publication date

  • December 2022