Peripheral serotonin: cultivating companionship with gut microbiota in intestinal homeostasis Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is an evolutionarily ancient and phylogenetically conserved monoamine that regulates multifaceted physiological functions in mammals. 5-HT was, at one time, most extensively studied as a neurotransmitter within the central nervous system but is now known to regulate nonneuronal functions including immune responses in an autocrine-paracrine-endocrine manner. Compelling evidence from intervention studies using germ-free mice or antibiotic-associated microbiota perturbation suggests that novel interactions between 5-HT and the gut microbiota are essential in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Importantly, recent studies reveal that bidirectional host-microbial interactions mediated by the host serotonergic system can promote distinct changes within the gut microbiota. These changes may potentially lead to a state known as “dysbiosis” that has been strongly associated with various gut pathologies including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this review, we update the current understanding of host-microbiota interaction by focusing on the impact of peripheral 5-HT signaling within this dynamic. We also briefly highlight key environmental risk factors for IBD, such as the Western diet, and draw attention to the interaction of synthetic food colorants with 5-HT signaling that may facilitate future research.

publication date

  • August 1, 2022